Sunday, February 17, 2019

Jewel Envy my favorite piece of "equipement"



Hello Sunday Readers,

There are many things in our daily life at work, that make it extraordinary! These things are extraordinary, because we get from them all we need to keep going, going with our lives, be proud of that we do, enjoy what we have done and what we could accomplish!

These things at work are very different for every one of us, but not less important! I can start with the facade of the big blue house where it’s the studio, it’s a gorgeous house in the Polish neighborhood, at Roncesvilles, with big windows, light is so important to me, I came from a country that shines, and its light goes with me wherever I go, it’s at work! It’s at the studio, I feel so fortunate every time I open the door, it’s the start of new day, another good and challenge day full of light!

 
Jewel Envy, The Blue House

My bench is big,  its location is the best, no one is behind me, I have 360 degrees view of the floor and the incredible people on it. My locker is one of the most important tools I have, it’s full of almost everything that makes my work an adventure every day, I know every piece by heart, it can be a heavy mandrel or a tiny drill, they all together make my work possible and unique.

 
The Studio at Jewel Envy



We have so many tools like the rolling mill machine, the casting machine, the ultrasound and many more that we share every day. We have an incredible room call The Crystal Palace, in there we get together with our costumers to discuss new designs! 

The Crystal Palace



It’s difficult to talk about all we have at the studio, the whole thing is the secret of what I love to do and it's  makes my work life so amazing!


You can join us at Jewel Envy from Tuesday to Sunday to have a look at this incredible place, the unique jewelry pieces and the goldsmiths that can make all yours dreams come through!

Have a nice Sunday!

Helena


Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Introducing Robin!




Hi!  I’m Robin, of House of Cassady. I’m the newest resident goldsmith to join the studio, and am so excited to have joined such a creative, vibrant and friendly environment.  I have newly returned to Toronto (my home town!), after spending 18 years in the United Kingdom, which is where I did most of my training in goldsmithing. 


I have been making jewellery for about 15 years, and have made a number of commissions for people (some of which are pictured below).



A client's piece of raw amber, that they wanted to have made into a pendant, so I made a sterling silver crocheted cage for it.
 
Sterling silver riveted cufflinks with a scratch finish and oxidised recess
Sterling silver and 9ct rose gold with opal triplets and round faceted sapphires made for a client on the Isle of Harris in the outer Hebrides of Scotland-inspired by the beaches and seaweed when I visited about two years ago.

 I spent a number of years exploring different techniques and getting to know the kind of style I most enjoy, with most of my inspiration coming from the world around me in nature, and science.  I love more organic shapes, texture and colour, and try to mix these elements up in my different pieces.

If you pop into the store sometime soon, you’ll be able to see my inaugural collection, inspired by immune cells (which I used to work on).  The original ideas for some of these pieces (pictured below) came from an initiative to blend science and art, a collaboration between the Edinburgh University and the Edinburgh College of Art (where I was living and working at the time in Scotland). 
 
Sterling silver asymmetric earrings in an oxidised finish with 

needle felted insert.


Delicate sterling silver roller printed hollow domes, in varying finishes on delicate silver bead effect chains


 Sadly, the initiative never quite got off the ground. However, the germ of an idea was born, and has culminated in a whole range of shapes that I use as base components.  The components underlie the unique, sterling silver contemporary pieces I have been making, incorporating gemstones, and needle felt.